Well, the Navajo was plagued with a few problems. In May 2000, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration contacted Ford and Firestone about the high frequency of tire failure on the Mazda Navajos, the Mercury Mountaineers and the Ford Explorers fitted with Firestone tires. Ford investigated and found that several models of 15 in Firestone tires had ridiculously high failure rates, particularly those made at Firestone’s Decatur, Illinois plant. Of course as many know, this lead to the rapid decline in value of at least the Explorer and probably the other models as well. The Mazda Navajo was a 2-door Sport Utility Vehicle that was launched in 1991. This was Mazda’s very first off-roader for the North American market, which was not so great considering the bad press. But anyway, it was available only as a four-wheel drive, two-door vehicle, and it was essentially a rebadged Ford Explorer Sport. It was marketed in the United States only, which was humorously because Mazda Canada did not want to market an SUV.

Car Transport Estimates For  Mazda Navajo

All Navajos were built in Louisville, Kentucky, the same place the Explorer was built. A rear-wheel drive Navajo was an option for 1992, gearing towards people who liked the sporty image of an SUV, but did not need four-wheel drive. These were the typical weekend warriors who would never go off road anyhow. Base models were now called the DX, more in keeping with the Japanese manufacturer’s typical way of referring to their base versions. Further, as expected, the 1993 Navajo picked up the same mechanical upgrades as the Explorer, such as augmented power for the V6 engine and four-wheel anti-lock brakes. Unlike the Explorer, however, the only other change was an optional CD player. This was not exactly much to draw in new buyers as a CD player could be had anyhow. Learn more about the Mazda Navajo by going here and receive an instant car transport estimate using our online rate calculator.