Chevy C10/K10
Vehicle Make/Model Specifications:
Make: Chevy
Model: C10/K10
Chevy C10/K10

Half-ton models were labeled the C10 and K10 short-bed trucks, and C15 and K15 was used to distinguish the long-bed trucks. For those looking for a real tough truck, the 3/4-ton C20 and K20, as well as the one-ton C30, were available. You will not see the "C" nomenclature on the GMC models, although their 4×4 versions had the "K" label. Options available to the consumer were a base version and a "Custom" version. In terms of what was under the hood powering these trucks, engines included 135 hp (101 kW) 236 in<sup>3</sup> (3.9 L) and 150 hp (112 kW) 261 in<sup>3</sup> (4.3 L) straight-6s, and a 283 in<sup>3</sup> (4.6 L) V8 with 160 hp (119 kW). The year 1967 welcomed a more modern look. This new redesign of the C/K trucks gave General Motors the opportunity to market trucks as general transportation rather than merely as work vehicles. This marketing attempt seemed to be successful given that there are many people who have vowed to purchase nothing buy Chevrolet trucks. Chevrolet introduced the C/K name for their full-size pickup truck line in 1962, and it lasted until 1998. The very first Chevrolet pickup truck made its debut in 1924, although in-house designs did not appear until 1930. A 10, 20, or 30 on the emblem indicates a 1/2, a 3/4, or a 1 ton truck. To distinguish between the two wheel and four wheel drive the letters "C" and ?›ƒ?ª?K?›ƒ?ª? were used. Two-wheel drive trucks were labeled with a ?›ƒ?ª?C?›ƒ?ª?, while "K" models had four-wheel drive. In 1988, the C/K light-duty pickup was replaced with the GMC Sierra. The Chevrolet Silverado followed in 1999 and the Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD heavy-duty pickups also followed in 2001. Two versions of the 1962 C/K trucks were available: smooth "Fleetside" or fendered "Stepside". GMC on the other hand called these "Wideside" and "Fenderside."

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