Packard Patrician
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Car Shipping for Packard Patrician For reasons beyond logical understanding, in 1951 and 1952, the automaker Packard attempted to use a numeric naming structure that designated Packard's least expensive models as Packard 200 and Packard 250. Now the problem with this is that it very clearly identifies who is cheap and who is a big spender. In reality, this was not a good move. However, before this naming scheme was written in stone, the Packard Patrician was built by the Packard Motors Corporation of Detroit, Michigan. It was offered from model years 1951 through the 1954, and then later by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, during the model years 1955 and 1956. Production was handled at the Detroit facilities. In keeping with the numerical naming scheme, the highest trim level offered was the Packard Patrician 400. The Patrician 400 supplanted the previous Custom 8 model range. The car was effortlessly identified from other Packards by its chrome trim; for example, in 1951 the model featured three chrome pieces on its rear end and in 1952 the car was decorated with four chrome details.

During the model years of 1953 and 1954, the Patrician unrelentingly represented Packard's highest trim level sedans. Further, during these years, the Patrician obtained annual trim changes and improvements that were regularly associated with changes of the 1950s. More upgrades and styling changes were in order, and although Packard couldn't afford a whole new makeover, new trim was added to look like a redesigned roofline. The cars were also outfitted with a wrap-around windshield, which brought it in line with the other American automobiles of the era. On the interior, the upholstery was modernized and the cars received a new dashboard that was faced with a machined looking stainless steel front. Oddly, today things are made to disguise that they are machines.


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