Volkswagen Corrado

The Volkswagen Corrado was a 3- door, front wheel drive, 2+2 compact hatchback that was created by Volkswagen and built by Karmann in Osnabruck, Germany. The car was designed as a successor the very successful Scirocco. It was built upon Volkswagen's B3 platform in the rear of the car, and interestingly used the A2 platform technology up front. This was something it shared with the then-current Golf and Jetta. It also shared many mechanical components with other Volkswagen A platform cars. In 1990 the Corrado hit the market in the United States. The Corrado debuted with two engine choices, with the first being a 1.8 L, 16-valve, 4-cylinder with 136 PS as the base model and the second being a supercharged 1.8 L, 8 valve 4-cylinder, marketed as the G60 and pumping out 158 PS. The latter engine was optional in Europe, but was in fact the only option for North American buyers at the time. The Corrado offered brilliant handling for its time and was listed as one of the 25 Cars You Must Drive Before You Die by the British magazine, Car. All Corrados included a unique rear spoiler that automatically rose when the vehicle reached a set speed. However, there were some problems with the Corrado, with the first being the perception that it was too expensive. As a result it reached a production total of just 97,521 units. On the other hand, many Corrado clubs exist around the world, and thus, it has become something of a modern classic. Volkswagen did introduce two new engines for the 1992 model year. The first was a naturally aspirated 2.0 L, 16 valve, 138 PS in-line four, which was basically an extension of the 1.8 L engine. The second was the praised 2.9 L, 12-valve, 190 PS VR6. The North American market model had a volume of 2.8 L and 178 PS, which was sold along with the G60 for the 1992 model year.