Toyota T100 2dr Short Bed

The Toyota T100 was a full-size pickup truck launched by Toyota in 1993 to compete with the American-made Ford F-150, the Dodge Ram and the Chevrolet C/K. Toyota was attempting to establish itself in the North American compact truck market in the 1980s and 1990s, as it aspired to capture part of the lucrative full-size truck market. But, of course, the T100 was criticized for being too small to appeal to buyers of full-size work trucks. Further, the lack of a V8 engine was also a serious hindrance to sales. T100 sales were flat at approximately 40,000 units in the United States for each year of production. During this same time period, General Motors' pickup sales were nearly 700,000 per year, while Ford sales swelled from 550,000 to nearly 850,000 and Dodge went from 100,000 to 400,000. The segment was clearly booming and Toyota was certainly missing a huge portion of the pie. The T100 did offer a full-size bed but had the engine, frame, and suspension components of a compact truck. It was hardly larger than the mid-size Dodge Dakota but smaller than a typical full-size pickup. Despite those drawbacks, it is worth noting that the T100 was lightweight and fairly fast for a pickup truck. When it was first launched, it was only offered as a regular cab with a 3.0 L V6. Later however in 1994, a 2.7 L I4 engine was added as an option. By 1995, Toyota responded to the demands of the market with an Xtra Cab model and a larger 3.4 L V6 that replaced the old 3.0 L. Three trim lines were offered, which included the base model, the DX, and the top-of-the-range SR5. The maximum towing capacity was 5,200 lb, which is not equivalent to what other makers were offering. Further, consumers really wanted that V8 engine. The T100s were assembled in Tokyo, Japan until 1996 when production moved to the United States at the opening of Toyota's new Gibson County, Indiana plant.