Toyota Celica

Toyota is a dominator in the American automotive market. It seems that what they touch turns to gold. Through all of the generations, the Celicas have been manufactured around Toyota's high-performance inline-4 engines. There are some Celicas though that are powered by more economical, lower performance 4-cylinders. The most radical change occurred in 1986, when the car's drive layout was changed from rear wheel drive to front wheel drive. A four wheel drive turbocharged model was produced from 1986 to 1999. Through seven generations, the model has gone through many revisions and has spawned the birth of numerous new models. These include the likes of the Toyota Celica Supra. The Celica was available as hatchback coupes, as well as a convertible. The Toyota Celica moniker has been applied to a number of popular sports cars made by the Japanese company Toyota. The name is derived from the Latin word celico, which means "from the heavens" or "celestial". This seems to be appropriate in terms of the cash flow that Toyota has experienced from the model. It all began when the first generation Celica was released to the market in 1970. It was supposedly a reduced version of Toyota's supercar, the 2000GT. It was displayed at 1970 Tokyo Motor Show in October, and marketed in December of the same year. The emphasis of the model was on styling and driving enjoyment. The Japanese models were known as the ET, LT, ST, GT, and GTV. In 2000, Toyota began manufacturing and selling the seventh generation Celica. It closely resembled the XYR concept car except for the front bumper and the rear spoiler. The 2000 Celica was a part of Toyota Project Genesis, an effort to bring younger buyers to the marquee in the United States. This seems to have been effective as many young people could and can be seen meandering around in their Toyota Celicas.