Subaru Kei

The Subaru Vivio, also known as a Kei car, was a model that was introduced in March 1992, and manufactured by Subaru. The moniker Vivio is a reference to the numbers 660 written in Latin numerals. It is also inspired by the word vivid. The Vivio supplanted the Subaru Rex, and was offered in 3 and 5-door versions. The Vivio Bistro was a version released with a retro theme, with a unique front and rear end, matching upholstery and modifications to the dashboard. The Vivio was available with a variety of supercharged 4-cylinder engines making it a fun little car to drive. The series was very popular in Japan. The Japanese Kei category of small automobiles, including passenger cars, vans and pickup trucks. They were created to exploit local tax and insurance relaxations, and are exempted from the requirement to certify that adequate parking is available for the vehicle. These standards originated after the end of the Second World War, when most Japanese could not afford a full-sized car yet had enough to buy a motorcycle. This was a true use of innovation and creativity to satisfy a particular and unusual market segment. To spur the growth of the car industry, as well as to offer an alternative delivery method for small business and shop owners, the Kei car standards were instituted. Because the regulations that restrict physical size and engine power, manufacturers have launched many advanced technologies to the class while staying within the regulation guidelines. As a result, Kei cars are often available with forced induction engines, automatic and CVT transmissions, front-, rear- and four-wheel drive, hybrid drive trains, air conditioning, GPS and many other features that are not commonly found in extremely small automobiles. The Kei cars feature yellow license plates to distinguish the classification. They are known as yellow-plate cars in English and Spanish-speaking countries.