Studebaker Commander

The Studebaker Commander was an automobile produced by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana and Studebaker of Canada Ltd. of Hamilton, Ontario. In 1927 the Commander moniker was given to Studebaker's middle series. Beforehand, that vehicle range had been known as the short wheelbase Big Six models. Also in the late 1920s in terms of name changes, the long wheel base Studebaker Big Six models were renamed the Studebaker President, and Standard Six models were renamed the Studebaker Dictator. Studebaker began using the Commander name in the 1920s and continued to do so until the company folded in 1966. The model held numerous positions in the Studebaker pecking order, and in fact, it sometimes changed its role in the Studebaker line-up from one year to the next. However, in 1935, the Commander was dropped from Studebaker's product line, only to be reinstated in 1937 at which point the name was applied to Studebaker's least expensive range, which was formerly known as the Studebaker Dictator. Then, in a confusion history of naming, in 1939, Studebaker introduced the Champion, and again the Commander line was positioned as the midrange vehicle. And even furthering the madness, Studebaker reintroduced the President moniker in1955 to denote its premium model range. Commander was thus shifted to the middle range model. Moreover, the Commander line was extended down in price with the launch of the Custom series. Finally, Studebaker placed the name on hiatus at the end of the 1958 model year. The name just would not go away, and in 1963, Studebaker again resurrected the Commander name for the 1964 model year to represent the next to lowest-priced Lark model. By this point, the Challenger was on the bottom. For the 1965 model year, the Commander shared the dual headlight layout with the Daytona and the Cruiser thus making it easy to tell the 1964 model from the 1965. Good luck though following the name.