Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud

The design of the Silver Cloud was a major change from the pre-war models and the highly copied Silver Dawn. The main design work was completed by J. P. Blatchley. The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud was the main car manufactured by Rolls-Royce from April 1955 until March 1966. It replaced the Silver Dawn and was, in turn, replaced by the Silver Shadow. The Silver Cloud II was later introduced in 1959. Anyhow, the chassis was a simple steel box section, welded together and very rigid. The car was 5.38 m long, 1.90 m wide, and came in weighing 1.95 tons. With the advent of the Silver Cloud II came very little changes externally. However it now had a 6.2 L V8 engine, which increased the weight to 2.11 tons. Performance was vastly improved and the top speed was raised to 183 km/h. Even with all this, the main improvements were made in acceleration and torque. Later, the Silver Cloud III arrived in 1962. External dimensions were slightly tweaked, and the interior was remodeled. Oddly, the weight was reduced by a little over 100 kg and improvements to the engine boosted speed and performance even more. The headlights were altered to a four-headlamp configuration that was remarkably similar to that of the later Silver Shadow. In fact, official Rolls-Royce documents state that the four-headlamp layout was released to prepare customers for the radically new Shadow that was in the works. There was a special version that was released although it is not terribly liked. It was called the Chinese Eye and featured work by Mulliner-Park Ward. Only about 100 were made which is seemingly good since they were not well liked. Indeed, it is hard to imagine a Rolls-Royce that is not well liked, but it looks like we all miss the mark at some point.