Rolls-Royce Corniche

The Corniche was Rolls-Royce's coupe and convertible version of the Silver Shadow that was produced between 1971 and 1996. The former version was discontinued in 1982. The Corniche was also sold as a Bentley, although that model became known as the Continental in 1984. The first car to wear the Corniche name was a 1939 prototype based on the Bentley Mark V, which was never manufactured because of the onset of World War II. The car used the standard Rolls-Royce V8 engine. It had an aluminum-silicon alloy block and aluminum cylinder heads with cast iron wet cylinder liners. Further, a 3-speed automatic transmission was standard. A four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs was enhanced with a hydraulic self-leveling system in the rear. Four wheel disc brakes were originally used, with ventilated discs added for 1972. The model was assembled and finished in London at Mulliner Park Ward. They manufactured the Corniche with twin SU carburetors with a single Solex 4-barrel carburetor that was introduced in 1975. Export models retained the twin SUs until 1980, when Bosch fuel injection was added. In 1986, the car was mildly redesigned as the Corniche II. For example alloy and rubber bumpers replaced earlier chrome ones. Also, an aluminum radiator was substituted and an oil cooler was added. Even more so, anti-lock brakes were standard but air bags were not available in the Corniche II. Other changes included new style rims, a new reverse warning lens type and pattern around the rear license plate. Not to mention, it had newly designed seats and a redesigned dash. Prior though in 1984, the Bentley version was updated with a new name, the Continental. Rolls-Royce really just cannot be matched. Anyone one looks at it, the designing is phenomenal and the mechanical integrity of the cars is nothing short of impressive.