Pontiac Firebird

The Firebird was launched in the same year as its platform-sharing brother, the Chevy Camaro. This also aligned with the release of the Mercury Cougar, which shared its own platform with another well-known car, the Ford Mustang. The Pontiac Firebird was a muscle car manufactured by the Pontiac Motor Division of General Motors and was offered from 1967 until 2002. The vehicle was, for the most part, powered by numerous V8 engines of different GM divisions over the years. While it was mostly Pontiac-powered until 1982, the Firebirds were built with several different engines from nearly every GM division imaginable. Firebirds were traditionally solid rear axle vehicles, which are also sometimes referred to as live axles. Pontiac however switched to a coil spring and torque arm rear suspension in 1982. The First Generation Firebirds had a unique styling. Unlike the Chevrolet Camaro, its bumpers were incorporated into the design of the front end and the rear taillights were inspired by the Pontiac GTO. Further, both a two-door hardtop and a convertible were available through the 1970 model year. Originally the car was only a side project for Pontiac, which had wished to produce a two-seat sports car of its own design. They were looking to base it on the original Banshee concept car. However, GM thought the vehicle would directly compete with its Chevrolet Corvette, and the decision was made to give Pontiac a piece of the market by having them share the F-body platform with Chevrolet. Pontiac was somewhat disappointed at the management's decision, but went about re-making the F-body with their own image. As it turns out, this was a great hit, and one that was entirely unexpected from all parties involved, including the press and buyers alike. Granted, the Firebird is no Corvette, but given what it had to work with, it did quite well.