Plymouth Suburban

The Plymouth Savoy was an automobile manufactured by the Plymouth division of the Chrysler Corporation of Highland Park, Michigan. In 1954, the Savoy was offered as a two-door coupe or as a four-door sedan only. But, in 1956, the line added a hardtop coupe and the Custom Suburban station wagon. In 1957 and 1958, the line also added a four-door hardtop sedan. Sadly though, by 1959, the Savoy was downgraded to entry-level rank. With this came the loss of both the hardtop models, as well as the side trim and the fancier interior. Plymouth has used the name Savoy on several automobiles throughout time. From 1951 to 1953, the Savoy name was applied to a station wagon, which upgraded the base model Suburban. Later it was applied to a line of full-sized Plymouths from 1955 to 1961. Another materialization of the name came with Plymouth's ill-fated downsized full-size cars from 1962 to 1964. When the name was introduced in 1954 as a 1955 model, the Savoy was Plymouth's mid-level car and was priced between the base Plaza sedans and the top of the line Belvedere models. By 1959, Plymouth had dropped the Plaza and substituted it with the Savoy, which made the Savoy the marquee’s entry-level automobile. Like their sedan and convertible cohorts, the Plymouth station wagons, such as the Suburban, featured four headlights and tail fins. The growing station wagon market inspired Plymouth to offer three different models for 1959. These included a four-door with seating for nine, a four-door that sat six and the nicely priced two-door. To minimize the cost of construction, the two-door version had sliding windows for the rear passengers instead of those that rolled up and down. No one seemed to mind this, and the style would continue to be used for many years to come.