Plymouth Fury

Interestingly, the Fury I was marketed to police and taxi fleets, or sold to private customers wanting a simple, no-frills full-sized car. The Fury II and Fury III, on the other hand, were the moneymaker lines. Many Sport Fury models came equipped with options such as automatic transmission, power steering, white sidewall tires, full wheel covers, stereo radios, vinyl tops and air conditioning. The Plymouth Fury was made from 1956 to 1978. It was originally introduced as a high priced model designed to showcase the talents and resources of the company. This was done with the intent of drawing consumers into the showrooms. It was made unique by the fact that the Fury was sold only as an off-white hardtop coupe with gold anodized aluminum trim. This styling was all that was offered in 1956, 1957 and in 1958. Later though, a Fury convertible was offered in 1960. By 1975, Chrysler moved the Fury name to Plymouth's remade mid-size models that had previously been marketed under the Satellite name. Further, a Fury Road Runner was offered on the redesigned coupe, but was quickly moved to the Plymouth Volare the following year. The full-sized Plymouth then went by the name, the Plymouth Gran Fury. The Gran Fury itself was quickly dropped after 1977, and the mid-sized models were dropped after 1978. There was no 1979 Fury, Gran or otherwise. Prior to this downfall though, in 1959, Plymouth launched the Sport Fury as its top model, at which point the Fury name was stepped down to replace the Plymouth Belvedere. In doing this, the Fury range now contained sedans and station wagons in addition to a hardtop coupe and a sedan. The Sport Fury series at the time only had only a 2-door hardtop and a convertible. Needless to say, numerous name changes over the years makes the model particularly hard to follow, but anyway one looks at it, success was had.