Plymouth Belvedere

The Plymouth Belvedere was selected as Plymouths NASCAR contender because of its proper size and weight for the class. This resulted in the 1964 body style being given a slightly lower-drag shape compared to other Plymouths of the era. The Plymouth Belvedere was an American automobile produced from 1951 through 1970. It was introduced on March 31, 1951 as a two-door pillar less hardtop. This was Plymouth's first model of such a design and was created in reply to the Chevrolet Bel Air. The Bel Air was the first two-door hardtop in the low-priced American market. It was introduced in 1950 and in turn ended that model year with great victory. The Belvedere remained as Plymouth's middle of the road full-size model through 1964, at which point the name was applied to Plymouth's new mid-size model. This model was a lightly face lifted version of the 1964 Plymouth. Further, the Belvedere-based models included the higher trimmed Satellite, the muscle car GTX and the budget muscle car, the Road Runner. The moniker would continue to be used through 1970, at which point, all midsize models took the Satellite name. The 1964 Belvedere is also noted for being the car used to introduce the 426 Chrysler Hemi engine. This was such a significant improvement that it won 1st, 2nd, and 3rd at NASCAR's Daytona race. In terms of popular culture, the first single to be aired on the Dr. Demento show was by "Weird Al" Yankovic, and it was a song called "Belvedere Cruisin'". The song was about how much Al liked driving his parents' 1964 Belvedere. Further, during Oklahoma's 50th Anniversary, a new 1957 Plymouth Belvedere was sealed in a concrete enclosure as a time capsule near downtown Tulsa. It is said to be unearthed June 15, 2007 during the state's centennial celebrations.