Packard Clipper

Packard Motors launched the Packard Clipper model as part of Packard's Nineteenth Series of vehicles. The car included fade away styling, which means that the front fenders smoothly molded into the front doors. The auto was run by the same engine that was used in the Packard 180 series. However, the Clipper was lower and wider than the previous Packards, and was in fact the first streamlined Packard. It was only available in one body series, a four-door sedan. Price wise, the Packard Clipper sat between the Packard 120 and the Packard 160. The Packard Clipper was offered from 1941 to 1954, and again by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation for 1955 and 1957. Note that the Clippers that were built for the 1956 model year are considered a stand-alone and are not a model of Packard. As it seems, Packard President James Nance had hoped to launch a new Clipper as a stand alone marquee, with the intent of targeting the mid range price field which he felt was dragging the Packard brand down. Due to a falling out between companies and employees, the Packard Clipper name was reintroduced and given to the company's entry-level models, which were previously known as the Packard 200. The Clippers were available in Special and Deluxe trim models, and as two and four door sedans. The model lived on though after its fall, as trim components from the 1956 Clippers were used to make the 1957 model unique from the President. On the exterior, this included a narrower Packard-type front bumper, 1956-style taillights and wheel covers. On the interior, the cars' dashboards were fitted with the same basic instrument cluster as the one that was used in the previous two years. The final product was a swanky Studebaker. Well, it depends on what one considers swanky.