Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight

General Motors wisely developed a system of sharing body panels between the models of its different makes. Oddly enough, the Ninety-Eight broke the standards a few times in its production run. For example, its second body makeover did not share body panels with the other senior models of either Buick or Cadillac. In fact, it did not even have its model makeover in line with the Eighty-Eight of the mid-1950s. The Oldsmobile 98, which was previously known as the Series 90 Custom Cruiser, was a full-size automobile sold by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors. The name goes quite a ways back, and first showed up in 1941. It was used again and again after American consumer automobile production resumed after the end of World War II. It remained the top of the line model, which is easy to distinguish because the lesser Oldsmobile models are named lower numbers such as 66 and 76. Both of these two were later replaced by the Oldsmobile 88 in 1949. Thus, the 88 and the 98 carried on into the 1990s as the meat of the full-size Oldsmobile lineup. This was of course until the Aurora would replace it in 1996. To add to the confusion, additional name have been used on this model such as the L/S and the Holiday. Further, the 98 Regency name became very common in the later years of the model as well. As it was the top-line Oldsmobile, the series had the most technologically advanced items available, which included Twilight Sentinel, and the highest-grade interior and exterior trim. To add to the distinct appearance, a majority of Ninety Eights had rear tailfins until 1985. Of course, these were much more preferred back then, than they would be today. The 98 was famous for other reasons as well, Public Enemy had a small hit in the 1980s with You're Gonna Get Yours, which was a song about an Oldsmobile 98.