Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

The Cutlass Supreme was Oldsmobile's version of a body style for one year. In 1967, the Cutlass Supreme line was expanded into a full series of its own that included a two-door hardtop coupe, a two-door pillared coupe, a four-door pillared sedan and a convertible. Generally, the interior of the Supreme model was more luxurious than the F-85. Further, and Cutlass series cars included a cloth or vinyl bench seat with armrest in the sedan models and all-vinyl bucket seats in the coupes and the convertibles. This mid-sized car was produced by General Motors strictly for the American market. As previously stated, it began as a trim package, and from there developed into its own roofline. It grew even more into a distinct line. The Cutlass Supreme moniker was around from 1966 to 1997. At that time, there was no replacement for the Cutlass Supreme, although the Intrigue, which was introduced for 1998, was styled similarly in size and was priced as such to replace the Cutlass models. A Cutlass itself is a short and thick slashing sword, with a slightly curved blade. Now how the company decided this was a good name is another story. Anyhow, the standard Supreme engine was Oldsmobile's 330 cubic-inch Rocket V8 rated at 320 horsepower in combination with a four-barrel carburetor and a transmission option which including a standard three-speed manual with column shift, a floor-mounted four-speed manual with Hurst shifter or a two-speed Jetaway automatic. Dissimilar from the Grand Prix and the similar Chevrolet Monte Carlo, the Supreme had front and rear body parts from the standard Cutlass line and was tirelessly marketed as part of it. This was in fact the key to its success – it was tied to that line of well-loved and well-known cars. Who knows what would have happened had it been named something else, like in keeping with the utensil theme, the Spoon Supreme.