Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais

The Oldsmobile Calais, which was renamed the Cutlass Calais for 1988, was a compact car manufactured by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors from 1985 through 1991. It was created to replace the Omega as it shared the GM N platform with the Pontiac Grand Am and the Buick Skylark. Later, it itself was replaced by the Oldsmobile Achieva in 1992. During this same time period, Oldsmobile also produced two other Cutlass models, the Cutlass Ciera and the Cutlass Supreme. Noteworthy, a special Cutlass Calais model was the 1990 to 1991 Quad-442, which used a high-output version of the Quad-4 engine in combination with a 5-speed manual transmission. Both the Cutlass Supreme and the Calais coupes received new front ends that incorporated four headlights, which copied the 1977 model. Sales of the Cutlass sedan were pretty terrible, which is why it is no surprise that the aero-styled sedan and coupe were dropped in 1980. The name though would be revived again in 1985 when the Calais was moved to the GM N platform. To bridge the gap, a formal 4-door sedan, a called the Cutlass and the Cutlass LS sedan was introduced, and thankfully sales picked up. Buick followed suit and did the same with their Buick Century sedan. The 4-4-2 package was added to the Cutlass Calais, and although it did not contain the Dual Gate shifter, it was more or less a ghost of the 1979 Hurst. It even had the same 350 V8. By 1981 it was time for a complete styling change to all of the GM A-bodies, which included the Cutlass. The 1981 line consisted of the Cutlass Supreme and the Supreme Brougham coupes and sedans, and also the Calais Coupes, the Cruiser and the Cruiser Brougham station wagons. This was a pretty filled out lineup that contained all the company needed to please even the choosiest of drivers.