Oldsmobile Aurora

The Oldsmobile Aurora was a luxury car produced by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors and released in 1995. It was a plush 4 door sedan that was built on the same Cadillac G platform as the 2-door Buick Riviera. When the Ninety Eight saw its fall in 1996, the Aurora took over as the flagship Oldsmobile. Additionally, it is the successor of the Ninety-Eight and the Eighty-Eight. A V6-powered model was introduced in 2001 to take over for the Eighty-Eight and the LSS and to provide a place for those drivers to turn. Interestingly, it did not display the Oldsmobile name on the exterior, and to further add fuel to the fire, there was a rumor that the name of the whole Oldsmobile marquee would be changed to 'Aurora'. The 1995 Aurora launched Oldsmobile's 'Aurora' L47 V8, a DOHC engine based on Cadillac's 4.6 L Northstar V8. The Northstar engine and 4T-80E had been restricted to Cadillac prior to the Oldsmobile Aurora. The Aurora was given much praise for its refined engine, excellent manufacturing, well-balanced ride and structural strength. Additionally, during normal crash tests done by the automaker to assess body rigidity, the Aurora's unibody construction actually broke General Motor's testing machine. In stead, a frame-crusher which was mostly used to test stronger truck frames had to be used. The car ended up exceeding federal standards for passenger cars by two times. Because of the success of the Aurora, Oldsmobile quickly launched other new models with the same Aurora styling, which included the all-new Intrigue and the Alero. This even included a refresh of the logo to be more visually in tune with the Aurora's emblem. The 1997 redesign of the Silhouette and the 2002 redesign of the Bravada also saw the type of styling on their front ends.