Nash Fraser

In 1922, Archibald Frazer-Nash founded Frazer Nash, a British automobile manufacturer and engineering company. The company was originally established in Kingston, but later moved to Isleworth, London in 1929. The company manufactured around 400 cars until the mid-1930s, which included a series of famous chain drive models. Later, the majority of the company was acquired by H. J. Aldington in 1932 and from there was run by the three Aldington brothers, H.J., Donald A. and William H. Aldy's son, John Taylor Aldington. These were the last family owners before being sold to Porsche, at which time they became the official importer for Great Britain in 1956. As the story goes, the business concentrated on creating sports cars, but unfortunately, the company was inundated with problems due to a lack of focus on actually making sales. They made great cars, but poor business decisions. Thus, the primary business operations were turned over in 1932. Further, cars marketed during the mid to late 1930s were labeled as Frazer-Nash-BMW and were essentially rebadged BMWs. They were the authorized British BMW importer until the outbreak of war in 1939. This partnership allowed for the BMW 328 engine to be developed by Bristol and to be used until 1956. Eighty-five more cars were produced from 1948 to 1957. These cars were unrelated to the pre-war Frazer Nash, but were an evolution of the BMW 328. The models included the Le Mans Replica, the Mille Miglia, the Targa Florio, the Le Mans Coupe and the Sebring. Also in 1956, the V-8 Continental rejuvenated the business relationship with BMW. The model continued to be made in limited quantities until 1960. In total, over the years, around 350 cars were built, and a large number survive today. One might say they do not make them like they used to. The relationship between the companies surfaced again in the 1960s when the name Frazer-Nash-BMW appeared on a BMW special. Sadly, Archibald Goodman Frazer-Nash died in 1965.