Mitsubishi Tredia

The Tredia was designed to fit between the existing Galant and the Lancer models in an attempt to increase the overall lineup of passenger vehicles under the marquee. The Cordia and the Tredia used front-wheel drive, and were similar in design to the contemporary Mirage. They integrated a MacPherson independent trailing arm suspension with front disc brakes and a manual or electrically controlled automatic transmission. Further, there was a choice between one of three engines: the first being a 1.4 L rated at 68 hp, the second being a 1.6 L rated at 74 hp and the third being a 112 hp turbocharged 1.6 L. Further, some smaller export markets also were privy to a carb-fed 2.0 L rated at 110 hp. The Mitsubishi Tredia was a subcompact sedan built by Mitsubishi Motors from 1982 to 1990. Allegedly, its name is derived from Mitsubishi's Three Diamonds logo however that plays out. Along with the Cordia and the Starion, it was one of the first cars imported and available to Americans by Mitsubishi without the help of its then cohort, the Chrysler Corporation. The cars were later given a mild makeover in 1983, and again shortly thereafter, four-wheel drive was offered in 1984. The model was in need of some mechanical upgrades by 1985 and so the engine range was overhauled at that time. This now allowed the cars to run on unleaded fuel, which including the introduction of a 1.8 L engine in both 100 hp naturally-aspirated and 135 hp turbocharged form. This occurred before production was discontinued in 1990. Upon release though, these fuel-efficient models enjoyed the lowest fuel consumption in its class. This was a great way for the company to draw some attention to the line independent from Chrysler. It appeared though that buyers were not really sure what to think of the new arrangement, as sales were only modest.