MG TC

The MG TC was the first post-war MG and it was launched in 1945. It was much like the pre-war TB, as it shared the same engine although with a slightly higher compression ratio of 7.4:1. This gave the TC 54.5 bhp at 5200 rpm but because it was using more modern interior design components, it allowed for a wider cockpit. The TC was exported to the United States, which was odd given that it was only ever built in right hand drive. The export version did have slightly smaller United States' specification sealed beam headlights and larger twin rear lights. This also included turn signals and chrome-plated front and rear bumpers. Needless to say, the export version looked quite different from the original design. This seemed to not be a problem though, as over 10,000 were produced, which was a large number by MG standards. The entire MG T series of cars, which included the TA, the TB, the TC, the TD and the TF, where basically body-on-frame sports cars that were produced from 1936 through to 1955. Later, they were replaced by the MGA. The first postwar cars were revivals of the 1914 14hp models. Granted, the latter were enlarged to a 15.9hp (2813cc). Much like the later 1920s cars they were reliable and well built, and were noted for their excellent all-weather equipment. The TC is equipped as a 4080n ccm, 16 HP beast, with a 4-speed gearbox. This car comes in weighing 1700 kg car, and imports were handled by company known as BOS A/S. Being the first postwar MG as previously mentioned, it was quite similar to the pre-war TB. This may be seen as a pitfall of the model as people were somewhat hesitate to be reminiscent, and rather, the focus was to the future, and not the past. It seems that a whole new design concept would have been favored.