MG Midget

The MG MGC was released in 1967 and came as a roadster or a GT configuration. Under the hood, power was supplied by a 2912 cc OHV six-cylinder pushrod engine that was capable of producing 150 horsepower and propelling the vehicle to around 120 mph. This was a fairly powerful automobile for the time being. Of course, it would not stand a chance today with all of the technological advances that have been made. The Midget was equipped with a 2912 cc, straight-6 version of the MGB sold in the late 1960s and was given the codename ADO52. It was intended as a substitute for the Austin-Healey 3000, which would have been codenamed ADO51. This project however never got beyond the design proposal stage. Like the MG MGB, it was offered as a coupe or as a roadster with a three-speed automatic gearbox being available as an option. The car was capable of 120 mph (293 km/h). In comparison to the MGB, the Midget brought many mechanical and performance improvements at a much lower price. Unfortunately, its fall in 1969 was much due to its similar styling to the MGB and poor press from the automotive media. This was in fact the kiss of death that never allowed the Midget to rise to its true potential. Under the hood, the engine had been moved back in the engine bay to create a 53/47 weight distribution, which was indeed an improvement. But, even with these modifications, the press criticized the car as suffering from poor handling. The first engine that was considered was an Australian created six cylinder version of the BMC B-Series. However, the production versions used a progression of the Morris Engines designed C-Series instead. This obviously turned out to be a mistake, but hindsight is always twenty:twenty.