MG MGC

Sometime down the line, the MG MGC was updated with a new engine, however, the update turned out to be more of a set back. The heavy engine, which came in 209 pounds heavier than the 1798 cc MGB engine, and new suspension changed the vehicle's handling, thus it received a very mixed response in the automotive press. The MGC was cancelled in 1969 after less than two years of production. Originally, the MGC was a 2912 cc, straight-6 version of the MGB sold in the late 1960s. It was given the internal code ADO52. It was also intended as a replacement for the Austin-Healey 3000, which would have been codenamed ADO51, but this never got beyond the design proposal stage. The first engine to be considered was an Australian-designed six-cylinder model of the BMC B-Series but the production versions instead used a modification of the Morris Engines designed C-Series. That was also the same engine to be used for the new Austin 3-Litre 4 Door sedan. When twin SU carburetor form was used in the MGC the engine produced 145 bhp at 5250 rpm. The body was in need of significant revision around the engine bay and the floor pan, but on the outside, the only differences were a distinctive hood bulge to accommodate the relocated radiator and create carburetor clearance. It did also have different brakes from the MGB, in addition to 15 inch wheels. Further, it had a lower geared rack and pinion and special torsion bar suspension with telescopic dampers. Like the MGB, it was available as a coupe, the GT model, and as a roadster. A three-speed automatic gearbox was available as an option for those who sought it. The car was capable of 120 mph, which was not great, but was a fighter for the time.