Mazda Miata MX5

The MX-5, as envisioned by its designers, is a small roadster with minimal necessary weight and mechanical complexity. Although, it is technologically modern, but a direct descendant of the small British roadsters of the 1960s, such as the Triumph Spitfire, the Austin-Healey 3000, the MG Midget and the Lotus Elan. The Mazda MX-5, also known as Miata in North America and Roadster in Japan, is a sports car built by Mazda in Hiroshima, Japan, since 1989. Its introduction was a significant development in reviving the roadster segment of sports cars. Other companies promptly introducing roadsters to their model ranges, such as the MG F, and the third-generation Toyota MR2. Style wise, the body is a conventional, but is a very light, unibody shell. The MX-5 also incorporates a unique truss work that connects the engine to the differential, minimizing flex and creating a tight, responsive feel. Traction control is also an option available on some models. There have been three generations of the MX-5, consisting of major stylistic and mechanical upgrades. The first generation, designated NA, sold over 400,000 units. It was produced from 1989 to 1997. It was initially equipped with a 1.6-liter straight-4 engine, and in 1994 with a 1.8-liter engine. The NA can be identified from the other models by its distinctive pop-up headlights. The second generation was introduced in 1998 with a slight increase in engine power; this version can be recognized by the fixed headlights. The third generation was introduced in 2005 with a 2.0-liter engine; and lastly, this model can be recognized by the fender bulges over the wheel wells. As of 2007, the MX-5 is one of the world's best-selling sports cars with over 800,000 cars sold. This is nothing short of a great accomplishment for Mazda. Successful car as such are important for keeping a brand afloat.