Mazda GLC

The first Mazda GLC, which appropriately stood for 'Great Little Car', was a version of the fourth-generation Japan-market Mazda Familia. The Mazda Familia is Mazda's compact family car, also known as the Mazda 323 in Europe, North America, New Zealand and Australia. The next generation was among the first Mazda cars sold in the United States. In the United States it was originally known as the GLC, then the 323, then finally from 1990 on as the Protégé. However, in South Africa it was known as the Etude. The Ford Focus-based Mazda3 replaced this platform for 2004, though Mazda still contributed much to the project. For the United States, the GLC was only available with one engine at a time. The new GLC overlapped with the old-style Mizer for part of 1977 and was manufactured through 1980 before being replaced by the next-generation GLC. It was available in several body variants: a five-door four-seat hatch, a three-door four-seat hatch, a five-door four-seat station wagon, a three-door four-seat station wagon and a three-door two-seat van with an extended roof profile. To add to the menu offerings, several of these were available in several trim levels. The second-generation American GLC appeared in 1981. It was only offered with a single engine and lasted through 1985, after which the next-generation Mazda 323 replaced it. The 1980 Mazda GLC was manufactured in April 1980 and was rear wheel drive. It was not the same as the 323 model. It featured a 1.5 L engine, and was front wheel drive. A station wagon version, which was simply a face lifted version of the previous rear-drive model, was also sold for some time. The 323 took the prize for Wheels magazine's Car of the Year for 1980. Overall, this was a long-lived model that put Mazda on the map in the United States.