Lincoln LS

Production of the LS ended on April 3, 2006. All of the Lincoln LS models were manufactured at Ford's Wixom Assembly Plant, which will sadly be idled in 2007. In total, about 262,900 LS models were built. The LS was introduced in early 1999 as a 2000 model year vehicle, in part as the successor for the Lincoln Mark VIII coupe. It was the first Lincoln in decades to offer an optional manual transmission, and with its available V8 power, rear wheel drive and near 50/50 weight distribution, the LS was an attractive alternative to the European and the Japanese sports sedans. The Lincoln LS, which stands for "Luxury Sport", was a mid-size entry-level luxury car from Lincoln. It shared the Ford DEW98 platform with the Jaguar S-Type and the Ford Thunderbird and competed with the BMW 5 Series, the Lexus ES, the Mercedes-Benz C-Class, the Acura TL, the Infiniti G35 and the Cadillac CTS. LS versions were originally to be dubbed LS6 and LS8 depending on engine choice, but those designations were replaced with "LS V6" and "LS V8", to avoid confusion with Lexus’ nameplate trademarks. The car is, however, usually referred to as simply the LS, so that all really became irrelevant. Prices for the LS for the 2000 to 2004 model years usually ranged from just under $30,000 for a base V6 model in 1999, to around $45,000 for fully equipped Special Edition V8 LSE trims in 2004. In 2005 and 2006, prices ranged from $39,945 for a base V8 model to $49,100 for a top-of-the-line V8 LS. Of course, these prices may be different depending on promotions and dealer add-ons. Elimination of the entry level V6 version resulted in the pricing level changes for 2006, moving the LS from the entry-level luxury segment to the mid-level luxury segment. This effectively changing its closest competitors to the Mercedes-Benz E-Class, the Cadillac STS, the BMW 5-Series, the Infiniti M45, the Acura RL and the Lexus GS.