Jeep Commando

The Jeepster was an automobile sold under the Jeep marquee and introduced by Willys-Overland in 1948. Unfortunately, it failed to find a market and was soon dropped. The Jeepster name was revived in 1966 on a new model, the Jeepster Commando. Once again, sales failed to meet expectations, and American Motors, the successor to Willys-Overland, removed the Jeepster name for 1972 and halted production after 1973. There are several unique body styles of the Jeepster Commando still floating around. They can be found as either a Station wagon SUV hybrid, a Convertible, a Pickup or as a roadster. Some of the unusual offerings were the deluxe station wagon with sliding rear windows and full interior trim. In the rarer cases, these models were finished with a two-tone exterior. The Hurst Jeepster Commando, which had a custom shifter, exterior graphics, and tachometer on the hood, is possibly the scarcest model of all production Jeeps. The convertible came in 3 types knows as either the Revival Jeepster, the Commando convertible or the open body roadster with no top at all. The Revival Jeepster was the showcase vehicle of the fleet, as it offered deluxe interior options, a powered convertible top and a Continental tire kit. The Commando convertible offered the same body, but with just the basic finish and equipment. After the Jeepster name was removed in 1971, the vehicle lived on for two more years as just the Jeep Commando. The Commando used one of three AMC engines, the 3.8 L or 4.2 L AMC Straight-6 or 5.0 L AMC V8. Over the years, 20,223 AMC-spec Jeep Commandos were made in 1972 and 1973. This was obviously not the most popular of the Jeep models, but nonetheless, it was a moderate seller. The Jeep brand was basically unaffected by the Commando, as it was neither a best seller nor a bomb.