Jeep CJ-7

One cannot get much better than the CJ-7 in terms of being a fun off-road vehicle perfect for running through creeks and mud. This has in fact made the CJ-7 very popular in the sport of mud racing, both with the stock body or a fiberglass replica. The Jeep CJ line of vehicles were a commercial version of the famous Military Jeep from World War II. The final CJs, the CJ-7 and CJ-8, were replaced in 1987 by the reworked Jeep Wrangler, which was substantially inferior to its predecessor. The CJ-7 featured a longer 93.4 in wheelbase than the CJ-5 and also lacked the noticeable curvature of the doors previously seen on the CJ-5. It was introduced in 1976 and an impressive 379,299 units were built in 11 years of production. In the early 1980s, the CJ used a "Hurricane"-branded version of the GM Iron Duke I4. Additionally, over the years a number of special edition model surfaced such as the Tuxedo Park Mark III, the Camper, the Renegade I, the Renegade II, the Super Jeep and the Golden Eagle. The CJ-7 featured an optional new automatic all-wheel drive system called Quadra-Trac, which was not necessarily known for its strength. It also included a part-time two-speed transfer case and an automatic transmission was also an option. Other comfort features were an optional molded hardtop, and steel doors. This hardy design has allowed the CJ-7 to remain in great condition over the years. It is not uncommon to find old Jeep CJ-7s for sale that look superior to many of the models that are available today. For example, the Jeep CJ-7 is a great example of how things used to be manufactured with great care, and would subsequently last for years to come. It seems that more recently, the mindset has switched to a throwaway attitude and unfortunately this seems to be making its way into the automotive industry as well.