Jeep CJ-5

The Jeep CJ, which stands for Civilian Jeep, was a commercial version of the famous Military Jeep from World War II. This model is a trip to drive and exciting to look at. Some have become quite enamored with their CJ-5s and kept them in pristine condition. Willys introduced the first CJ, known as the CJ-2, in 1944, and the same basic vehicle stayed in production through 7 variants and 3 corporate parents until 1986. In fact, many do not know that a variant of the CJ is still in production today under license. The last CJs, the CJ-7 and CJ-8, were replaced in 1987 by the reworked Jeep Wrangler, which in reality is no match for this champ. The CJ-7 is very popular in the sport of mud racing, both with the stock body or a fiberglass replica. The CJ-5 was influenced by new corporate owner, Kaiser, and the Korean War M38A1 Jeep. It was projected to replace the CJ-3B, but that model ended up continuing in production. The CJ-5 repeated this pattern, continuing in production for 3 decades while three newer models appeared. It was just that no model could compare and consumers were demanding that the CJ-5 stay around. Over its lifetime, an impressive 603,303 CJ-5's were produced between 1954 and 1983. The original company was sold to American Motors in 1970, and the General Motors' engine was retired after the 1971 model year. AMC then began using their inline 6 engines, the 232 and 258 and in 1972 offering one V8 engine in the same tune as a base V-8 muscle car known as the 304CID. In the early 1980s, the CJ used a "Hurricane"-branded version of the GM Iron Duke I4. Additionally, over the years a number of special edition model surfaced such as the Tuxedo Park Mark III, the Camper, the Renegade I, the Renegade II, the Super Jeep and the Golden Eagle.