GMC Suburban

The word "Suburban" has been previously and loosely used to indicate a windowed, station wagon type body on a commercial frame which has been done by Dodge, Plymouth, Studebaker, Chevrolet, and GMC. The GMC Suburban of the future is really not all that different as the 1990s and 2000s models are full-size SUVs with three rows of seating on a full pickup truck frame with a V8 engine. Logically, the trucks are popular with large 'suburbanite' families on account of their "go anywhere, haul anything" nature. As with everything, there is a downside and this model has been criticized for being excessively bulky and having poor fuel economy ' but what would you really expect from a vehicle of this size. Nevertheless and to this day, the GMC Suburban is one of the few station wagons available with all bench rows. It really doesn't look like this model is going anywhere for a long time. The GMC Suburban is the granddaddy of all granddaddies! This is the true Sport Utility Vehicle, although it is really more of a hip minivan. Furthermore, the name is so appropriate as suburban moms and dads across America are toting their families around in this automobile. The GMC Suburban is a large sport utility vehicle and it is one of the longest-lived automobile nameplates in the United States. The name dates all the way back to 1935 and hopefully will remain in effect for many years to come. The GMC Suburban has spent most of its legacy as a passenger wagon bodied version of the Chevrolet pickup truck. Particularly modeling the Chevrolet C/K series of truck-based vehicles. Over the years is has proven itself to be one of General Motors most profitable vehicles. Not to mention, if you own one of these babies it is probably holding its value fairly well granted you don't have dog hair and children's toys strewn about it.