Ford Ranger 2dr Short Bed

In North America, the Ranger is Ford's well-liked compact pickup truck. In the 1960s and 1970s, the name was used as an option package on the Ford F-Series thus causing some confusion down the road. The Ranger 2 door short bed replaced the Ford Courier, an American version of the Mazda B-Series in a division largely dominated by the Toyota and the Datsun pickup trucks. To the pleasure of Ford, the Ranger was the best-selling compact pickup in America from 1987 to 2004. The Ranger and the related Mazda B-Series are manufactured at Ford's Twin Cities Assembly Plant in Saint Paul, Minnesota, which is now sadly scheduled to close in 2008. Over the years, they were also assembled in Edison, New Jersey at a plant that closed in 2004. In 2006, an all-new Ranger, known internally as P273, was in the works to be introduced by 2010. The P273 was slated to be Ford's world pickup, and was apparently to be merged with the Mazda world pickups. Instead rumors have surfaced that Ford may simply discontinue the Ranger line completely in North America. Ford is holding out on announcing their future product plans in the compact pickup market segment until closer to the end of Ford Ranger production at the Highland Park, Minnesota plant in 2008. Ford chose instead to invest improvements in the Ford Explorer SUV which was built on a more advanced platform than the Ranger 2dr short bed, which inevitably allowed the Ranger sales to decline. A similar disaster strategy was applied to the Ford Taurus, which was another former bestseller that was replaced by two new nameplates rather than being redesigned. Analysts have stipulated that these types of decision have led to Ford's current financial losses. Ford seems to have lost focus on the models that have served them well in the long run, and instead taken the much easier approach of assuming other models would pick up the slack. What they failed to consider was that those models were popular and successful for a reason.