Fiat Palio

While most cars are aimed at the upper end European or American consumers, the Fiat Palio was created with another agenda in mind. This supermini is Fiat's car aimed at developing countries. It is produced in Brazil, India, Turkey, South Africa and China as a hatchback, sedan, station wagon and pickup truck. It is also built under license in North Korea and marketed as the Pyonghwa Hwiparam. The station wagon and pickup versions are also sold in Western Europe. Fiat has described this automobile as their attempt to build a 'world car', one that would be available in places far and wide. The engines, both diesel and gasoline, varied from region to region depending on local production capability, legislation and market requirements. The basic chassis was a vague development of the Uno, as little remained unchanged. The entire structure had to be significantly stronger in order to survive on the rougher roads found in some of the markets in which it would be sold. Of course, the same goes for the suspension. The body on the other hand was a completely new design by the I.DE.A Institute of Turin, who is also credited for the interior design. The Fiat Palio came to be in a manner somewhat like the domino effect. Production began in 1996 in Brazil and was followed later that year by a plant in Argentina. 1997 saw production starting in Venezuela, Poland and Morocco whilst Turkey started building the same car in 1998. India and South Africa began production in 1999, Egypt in 2001 and China in 2002. Oddly enough, and seemingly outside of the focus, several competition and homologated versions of the Palio have been produced, such as the A6 class rally car. It is appearing to be that perhaps even cars can bring the world closer together.