Ferrari GTO

The Ferrari GTO is widely considered to be the quintessential Ferrari model, and one of the most famous sports cars of all time. It was a supercar and an auto-racing car made by Ferrari in the early 1960s. The numerical part of its name denotes the displacement in cubic centimeters of each cylinder of the engine, whilst GTO stands for "Gran Turismo Omologata", which is Italian for "Grand Touring Homologated." In 2004, Sports Car International named the 250 GTO number eight on the list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s. It also placed the GTO as the number one sports car of all time. Similarly, Motor Trend Classic named the 250 GTO as number one in their list of the "Greatest Ferraris of all time". The 250 GTO was conceptualized as a model to compete in GT racing. It was a conservative adaptation of the 250 GT SWB. Giotto Bizzarrini, chief engineer, took the chassis from the 250 GT SWB and mated it with the 3.0 L V12 engine from the 250 Testa Rossa. After the famous firing of the Ferrari engineers after a dispute with Enzo, Bizzarrini was replaced and development was handed over to a new engineer named Mauro Forghieri and to designer Sergio Scaglietti. The acclaimed body was developed by Bizzarini and Scaglietti and perfected in wind tunnel and track testing. This was unique from the other vehicle designs in that it was not created by a specific individual or a design house. The GTO also had a slightly unique interior in that it was stripped-down and simple to the extreme. It was taken to the point where a speedometer was not considered necessary for the instrument panel which one might argue is relevant in the case of a Ferrari ' they are usually not driven with a high regard for the speed limit anyway.