Edsel Citation

Perhaps the worst name for an automobile would be the 'Citation' as it would elicit the feelings one has as they are being pulled over by the highway patrol for speeding. Nevertheless, this is exactly what was released ' the Edsel Citation. The Edsel Citation was an automobile produced by the former Mercury-Edsel-Lincoln Division of the Ford Motor Company of Dearborn, Michigan. It was sold under the Edsel marquee in 1958. The Citation was built off the longer Edsel platform, which was also shared with the Mercury brand automobiles, and the Edsel Citation shared its body with the Edsel Corsair. The Citation represented the highest trim level available within the Edsel brand, which really was not saying much. In addition to deluxe interior appointments, the Citation also received extra stainless steel details among other exterior styling upgrades. Riding on a 124 in wheelbase, the Citation was powered by a 410 in<sup>3</sup V8 producing 345 bhp. While its roll-out was highly publicized in the fall of 1957, the 1958 Edsel was a marketing disaster for Ford. In the end, the total Citation output in the United States and Canada stood at 8,577 units, of which 930 were convertibles, 5,112 were four-door hardtops, and 2,535 were hardtop coupes. Prices for these models ranged from $3,500 to $3,766. For the 1959 model year, the Citation was dropped after one lousy year. Oddly enough, the Citation convertible remains one of the most sought after models amongst modern-day Edsel collectors. It seems that Ford would love to have kept a few around for a rainy day. One never knows, it could be reintroduced at some point down the line. Either way, the Edsel brand was doomed, and in a way, that has made the cars more valuable because so few ever made it out into the public's hands.