Eagle Vision

The Eagle Vision was a large four-door, full-size, front-wheel drive sedan. It was produced by Chrysler from 1993 to 1997 as the substitute for the AMC and Renault-designed Eagle Premier. Some may notice a vague similarity to the first generation Chrysler Concorde, the Chrysler LHS, the Chrysler New Yorker and the Dodge Intrepid. The reason for the resemblance between the Vision, the Intrepid, the LHS, the New Yorker and the Concorde is because they were collectively built upon the same platform and subsequently designated the LH. In Europe, the Eagle Vision was badged as the Chrysler Vision. The model made its star debut at the 1992 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It seemed to have won over the critics, given that it was on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1994. The original design was based on the 1987 revolutionary design, called the "cab-forward". The cab-forward design was characterized by the long, low slung windshield and relatively short overhangs. The wheels were effectively pushed to the corners of the car, which created a much larger passenger cabin than the contemporaries of the time. Without badges, the Vision could easily pass as a Concorde. The only main divergence between the two were the taillight clusters, as the Vision incorporated amber turn signals rather than the Concorde's red. The Vision also did not have the Concorde's rear light bar between the two taillights. The Intrepid, on the other hand, featured completely different head and taillights and did not have a grille at all. The Eagle Vision ESi came equipped with a 3.3 liter V6 engine initially producing 153 HP and rising to 161 in the 1994 models and on. Given that there were so many similar models on the market at the same time it is a wonder that any of them were successful in their own right.