Dodge Stealth

Dodge did a remarkable job naming this vehicle. When one hears the name 'Stealth' a powerful fighter plane comes to mind and to throw a car into that mix was just genius. The Dodge Stealth, also known as the Mitsubishi GTO, is the name of two different sports cars built by Mitsubishi Motors, both of which were rebadged for many export markets. The first, sold from 1970, was a two-door hardtop coupe with modern-day American muscle car styling, straight-4 engines and rear wheel drive. After production ceased on that model, the GTO, which stands for Grand Turismo Omologato, lay dormant for fifteen years until Mitsubishi revived it for their new flagship sports grand tourer. Many probably know this model as the Mitsubishi 3000GT. The Dodge Stealth was available from 1991 to 1996 with only minor appearance changes made from the Mitsubishi model. Following the triumphant showing of the Mitsubishi HSX concept car at the 1989 Tokyo Motor Show, Mitsubishi developed the new model as a technically advanced sports coupe. It was meant to compete with the Mazda RX-7, the Nissan 300ZX and the Toyota Supra. They brought back the GTO name, however, despite the prestige of the badge at home in Japan, it was known as the Mitsubishi 3000GT outside Japan. Mitsubishi was concerned that connoisseurs would object to the evocative nameplate from the highly regarded Ferrari 250 GTO and Pontiac GTO being used on a Japanese vehicle. The sense of nationalism did prove to be an issue at one point or another. A Dodge Stealth was initially to be used as a pace car for the 1991 Indianapolis 500 race. The United Auto Workers, however, did not like the idea of a Japanese-manufactured car being a pace car for the race. Consequently, a Dodge Viper prototype was used instead.