Dodge Monaco

The Dodge Monaco was a full-size automobile produced and retailed by the Dodge division of the Chrysler Corporation between 1965 to 1978 and then again from 1990 to 1992. The Dodge Monaco's original purpose was to compete with Pontiac's Grand Prix model which sat in what came to be known as the personal luxury market. The Dodge Monaco was introduced in 1965 as a hardtop coupe and was based on the Dodge Polara two door hardtop coupe. In order to distinguish the model and hopefully create some buzz around the brand, the Dodge Monaco received special badging, different taillights, different grille treatment, and a center console which was uncommon at the time. In the Canadian market, the Monaco was Dodge's version of the Sport Fury and was available in hardtop or convertible body styles. Unlike the American Monaco, the Canadian Monaco could be had with the better 318 in<sup>3</sup> V8 or even the slant six. Name changes were becoming customary and in 1966 the American Custom 880 series became the Monaco. The former Dodge Monaco then became the Dodge Monaco 500. On the other hand, in the Canadian market, the Dodge hung onto the "Monaco" name for the Sport Fury equivalent and Polara 880 for the Fury III competitor. By 1967 the Monaco name was applied to all premium trim levels which replaced the Polara 880 at the top of the Dodge line. In 1969 Dodge Monaco and Polara models offered the "Super-Lite" option, which placed a quartz road lamp on the driver side grille for better visibility. This may bring to mind something that either looks like a police car or a taxi cab. This was obviously not popular, and worse illegal in some states. Needless to say, Dodge dropped the light option at the end of the year.