Dodge Daytona

With a name like the Daytona, drivers are going to expect a lot from this model, particularly great speed and responsive handling. The Dodge Daytona was a front-wheel drive hatchback based on the Chrysler G platform, which was a derivative of the Chrysler K platform. The Daytona remained in production for almost a decade from the 1984 model year until the 1993 model year. So as not to be confused, one should know that the Chrysler Laser is an upscale near twin version of the Daytona. A facelift of the Daytona was completed for 1987, and again for 1992. The Daytona was not a new concept car, but merely a replacement for the Mitsubishi-based Challenger. It was slotted between the Charger and the Conquest. Later, the Daytona was replaced by the 1995 Dodge Avenger, which was being built by Mitsubishi Motors. The Daytona appropriately derives its name from the Dodge Charger Daytona, which itself was named after the famously fast Daytona 500 race in Daytona Beach, Florida. To power this little monster, the Daytona originally used the 2.2 L Chrysler K engine in normally aspirated (93 hp) or turbocharged (142 hp) form. The 96 hp 2.5 L K engine was added in 1986 to the pleasure of drivers. Then in 1985, the 2.2 L Turbo I engine's horsepower was increased to 146 hp. Meanwhile, the 1984 Daytona was available in three trim lines: the standard, the Turbo and the Turbo Z. Overall total production was reasonable at 49,347. Further, the Daytona Turbo was on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1984. Not that this was the reason for its success, but the Daytona was available with the Chrysler Electronic Voice Alert system through 1987. A special "Shelby" edition of the Daytona was welcomed in 1987 which was a pleasure for drivers.