Chrysler Laser

The person who named the Chrysler Laser was hopefully soon thereafter fired. This is for sure one of the worst possible names for an automobile. It seems that the name would only resonate with science fiction fanatics who were not exactly the target market for this sporty little car. The Chrysler Laser was Chrysler's attempt at creating a sports car to expand their upscale brand lineup, which might have been more effective under another name. The Laser was essentially a virtual clone of the Dodge Daytona. Production was very short and only lasted from 1984 to 1986. The only differences between this model and ones already on the market were limited to aesthetic attributes, such as spoilers, side skirts and air dams and the use of a digital instrument cluster in the XE trim. The first edition Laser was available in two trim lines – standard and XE, not that either proved to be very popular. In an attempt to shake things up, in mid-1985 the XT trim was added as the top-of-the-line version. A turbo version was also an option and could be recognized by its use of black hood louvers. In terms of the power under the hood, the 2.2 L Turbo I engine was available as standard equipment in the XE and XT trim lines and optional on the standard model. The Laser was intended to replace the Chrysler Conquest, which was a rear wheel drive vehicle that competed openly with the Toyota Celica Supra. Thankfully, in 1987 the Chrysler LeBaron was redesigned as a more appropriate sports car and there was no longer any need for the Laser. Somehow though, the Laser lived on and its luxury performance image was carried over into the 1987 Dodge Daytona Pacifica and the Lancer Pacifica. Luckily though, they did drop the Laser name.