Chrysler Grand Voyager

The Grand Voyager minivan, sister to the Voyager, was only about 2 inches longer than its cohort, but it had a good-sized rear cargo area even when all 7 seats were in use. In Europe, the Chrysler Voyager was first released in 1988 and was nearly identical to its American counterpart, the Plymouth Voyager. It did however differ in the head/taillights and grille. This must have been a smart move seeing that it is still produced today at the Magna Steyr plant in Austria. Additionally, modern European Voyagers have special engines, including diesel engines, which are popular in Europe. On this side of the ocean, it is currently sold in Mexico. The Voyager sold there is nearly identical to the North American Dodge Caravan, with the exception of the grille. In the United States, the Chrysler Voyager was manufactured from 2000 to 2003 as a hang over from the Plymouth brand. Previously, before the changes were made amongst the companies, the Plymouth Voyager was in production since 1984 only under a different brand name and being produced by a different company. Later, to keep consumers in the loop as to what mergers and buyouts had occurred, the Voyager name was integrated into the Chrysler Town and Country's trim lineup for 2004. Despite the fact that North American customers can longer purchase the Voyager, it is still available in Europe. When the name of the Voyager switched into the Chrysler family, it joined a prestigious bunch. The Chrysler minivans are credited with creating the entire market segment for these vehicles. One will never find the Chrysler Voyager in Canada given that it was never released there on account of its counterparts, the Dodge Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country, being available instead. Perhaps the greatest feature of the Grand Voyager pertained to storage. With the second and third row seats upright, covered storage bins in the floor are accessible providing a total of 12 cubic feet of extra under-floor storage space.