Chrysler E Class

If you blinked, you missed the Chrysler E-Class all together! It was a mid-size car produced by the Chrysler Corporation and introduced in 1983. It first appeared on a stretched version of the Chrysler K platform. Sadly, it sold very poorly and the vehicle was renamed the Plymouth Caravelle for 1985. The engine choices were limited to the 2.2 L naturally aspirated I4 and the Mitsubishi 2.6 L I4. The K platform that the car was built on ranks as one of the most overt uses of platform sharing in automotive history. Chrysler even went so far as to advertise the K-Cars as a group. They in turn used the term in publications, and even put "K" badges on some models. They later advertised the LH cars similarly, but changed their tune slightly and placed less emphasis on the platform. It seems that buyers really didn't care much about this and were significantly more concerned with how the car looked, how it drove and how reliable it was. Rumor has it that the K platform was a product of brainchild of Lee Iacocca. According to historians, the platform was originally rejected by Ford Motor Company when Iacocca was the chairman, which was allegedly right before he was terminated in 1978. These K model cars such as the E-Class have been categorized as compact for their external size and small front-wheel drive layout. They were designed to carry six adults, which in reality seems a little unrealistic. The E-Class contained two bench seats, with each meant to hold three adults. This model was a response to the competition on the market such as the Chevrolet Malibu and the Ford Fairmont. Additionally, it was a replacement for the Dodge Aspen and the Plymouth Volare. Perhaps the E-Class would have been more successful if it wasn't marketed to seat six adults, which in some regards was misleading or down right ridiculous.