Chrysler Cordoba

Chrysler Cordoba signaled a couple of firsts for the Chrysler Corporation. It was the company's first model designed purposely for the personal luxury market and the first Chrysler-branded vehicle that was less than full-size. The Cordoba was technically in the intermediate personal luxury segment and was available from 1975 until 1983. This marked a time in history when Chrysler moved away from what the rest of the automotive industry was doing and declared that there would "never" be a smaller Chrysler. This was in response to other brands that were expanding into smaller cars with such models as the Mercury Comet and Buick Skylark. Of course, this was occurring in the 1960s, and it would most likely be a different situation today given the high cost of fuel. As it turned out, "never" only seems to mean fifteen years to Chrysler, because that is how long it took for them to disprove that statement. Cordoba is indeed the name of a city in Spain, but the car's emblem was actually a redesigned version of the Argentine Cordoba coin. However, no matter what way you prefer to look at it, the implication was Hispanic, and the theme was extended to the trim inside. Chrysler proceeded to play on the theme by having Mexican movie star Ricardo Montalban as the advertising spokesman. This all seemed to resonate well with consumers given that the Cordoba became one of Chrysler's few genuine hits of the 1970s. This was a tumultuous time for the company, for they were teetering on bankruptcy. For the first few years of production, demand actually exceeded supply. Production had reached over 150,000 annually. And where were all of these Chrysler Cordobas coming from? They were rolling very quickly, although not quickly enough off of the assembly line in Windsor, Ontario.