Chevy Prizm

The Chevrolet Prizm, also known as the Geo Prizm prior to 1997, was a small car available from the 1989 through 2002 model years. The Prizm was brought to market to replace the Nova and in reality was only a rebadged version of the Toyota Sprinter. (The Sprinter was an upmarket version of the Toyota Corolla.) Fremont, California was the starting point for all of the Prizms given that they were built at NUMMI, which stands for New United Motor Manufacturing, Inc. NUMMI is a joint venture plant between Toyota and General Motors. In 1993 the Geo Prizm was redesigned giving it more room, which subsequently upgraded it according to the EPA to "compact" car status. A new engine option was also added and drivers could now select the 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine on the LSi trim package. Things quickly went down hill and in 2002 the Prizm went under the chopping block and production ended in November 2001. One reason for the Prizm's unpopularity might have been its in-house competition. Certainly Chevrolet would have considered this when the model was released. It was shorter than the Chevrolet Cavalier yet slightly more expensive, which obviously made it the less desirable model. Even after the Prizm has been retired, it is still fairly easy to get your hands on a very similar model. The Prizm was a mere clone of the Corolla and a similar model lives on to this day in the Pontiac Vibe. Even though the Prizm was virtually identical to the Toyota Corollas the marketplace never accepted them to the same degree. In fact, in 2006, NADA put the value of a 2002 Prizm at just $7,300. Meanwhile, they gave the Toyota $9,150. It looks like the smart shopper would go out and buy the Prizm and avoid paying the extra $2000 for the Toyota name.