Chevy Lumina APV

In 1990, the Chevrolet Lumina APV made its first appearance as a minivan produced by General Motors and lasting until 1996. This vehicle was similar to the Pontiac Trans Sport and the Oldsmobile Silhouette. This was General Motors' first attempt at entering the highly competitive at the time minivan market. It faced steep competition from others such as the Dodge Caravan and the Plymouth Voyager. As it turns out, the Lumina APV didn't end up being much competition at all and Chrysler continued to retain its dominance in this market segment. Perhaps the first problem with the APV was the acronym; "APV" stood for "All Purpose Vehicle". Consumers felt that although the vehicle itself was certainly versatile and contained many innovative features, they felt that the curious space age design was less than appealing. For those wondering, it shared the unibody frame with the GM A platform The funniest part about the failure of the Lumina APV is that it failed because General Motors tried to be innovative and bring a new style to the marketplace. This is so ironic because in the past when the company has brought out a failure model it has been because they were not innovative enough. Prior to the Lumina APV no one had tried to market a stylish or sporty minivan, and General Motors wrongfully felt that that represented a potentially large market segment. It turns out that the soccer moms of the 1990s were not really that interested in looking space age, but were much more interested in the performance and reliability of the vehicle. Who knows how the Lumina APV would be received today given the change in consumer preference. There have been a number of recently released space-age looking models that have been surprisingly well received so maybe Chevrolet should consider bringing this baby back for a second time around.