Chevy Cavalier

The Chevrolet Cavalier is really not an original automobile and in fact it is just Chevrolet's version of the compact GM J platform. It seems that the Cavalier was released with the intent of competing with quality imports such as the Honda Accord. Oddly enough, considering the tough competition, it was one of the most popular cars in the United States and Canada from its release in early 1981. It continued this success for some time and retained its best selling status into 2000. It trailed only the Ford Taurus, Toyota Camry, and Honda's Accord and Civic in total sales, which is no small deed. Produced ended in 2005 as consumer preferences began to change and General Motors faced new challenges. The Cavalier initially replaced the Monza, which was offered as a 2-door coupe, a 3-door hatchback and a 3-door wagon. It sat on the same body as the discontinued Vega wagon. This left the Cavalier, which was available as a 2-door coupe, 4-door sedan and 4-door station wagon, to fill in the gap in the mid-sized car segment. The Cavalier was welcomed as a car that the entire family could fit in and not be crammed packed, and yet, not be excessively large. Additionally, the Cavalier faced very few mechanical problems in its early days, which really helped to build a solid and loyal customer base. Sadly though, trends began to change in the late 90s and early 2000s and people were looking for cars that were a bit more stylish, of which the Cavalier was not viewed as such. Perhaps Buick dropped the ball in terms of marketing the vehicle to the younger generation and as its customer base aged, the sales began to suffer. Consequently, in 2005, production was no longer profitable and it was discontinued along with a host of other models.