Chevy Caprice

From the 1965 through 1996 model years the Chevrolet Caprice, later called the Caprice Classic, was a series name of automobiles produced by Chevrolet, a division of General Motors, in the United States. It began life as a luxury trim package for the Impala four-door hardtop sedan, which was in response to the successful Ford LTD series. This model featured a stiffer suspension, higher-grade carpeting and higher-grade cloth and vinyl seat/door trim. Walnut trim on the dashboard and door panels was also part of the package deal. The luxury continued with pull straps on the doors, extra convenience lights, special full wheel covers and a vinyl top. Bob Lund, Chevrolet's General Sales Manager, gave the Chevrolet Caprice its name. He allegedly came up with the idea as a notion to a classy restaurant he frequented in New York City. The Caprice quickly became the new top-line full-sized Chevrolet. This knocked the Impala, which was formerly the top model, down a peg to second-best. The Bel Air and Biscayne pulled up the rear at the lower end of the lineup. The Caprice was later renamed the Caprice Classic in 1973 at which time a convertible version was added that ended up only lasted three years before it was dumped. The Caprice kept up a pretty good reputation over the years as the most-expensive and most luxurious model of the Chevrolet full-size car range. During its lifetime this also included the Biscayne, Impala and the Bel Air. Oddly enough, when production was suspended this left the Ford Crown Victoria as the last traditional full-size American sedan. The Caprice did however receive some recognition before it was placed back in the closet. It was honored with the Motor Trend Car of the Year award in 1977 and 1991 and was on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1983.