Chevy Camaro

There are very few cars as popular as the Chevrolet Camaro. This car has definitely earned itself a cult following in North America. This pony car, made in North America by the Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors was introduced on September 29th 1966. It was launched with the primary purpose of competing with the Ford Mustang. It shared the platform and other major components with the Pontiac Firebird, which was also introduced in 1967. After a valiant sales run, production ended in 2002. During its span in the marketplace, four distinct generations of the car were produced. Chevrolet couldn't seem to let this one sit idle for long, give that a new Camaro is expected to roll off assembly lines in 2009. Despite popular belief, this car was not an instant and easy sell to American youth. In fact, the Camaro was initially advertised on Top 40 AM radio stations in an attempt to attract the young adult market. This car is much better described as a muscle car than its technical name as a compact car. General Motor's researchers found the word Camaro in a French dictionary as a slang term for "friend" or "companion, yet the name was not conceived in this manner. Rumor has it that it was conceptualized as such before the French meaning was even known. It seems that the Camaro has a few other names that is was once known by, such as "Panther", the project designation XP-836, and "Chaparral". The Camaro is well seen throughout popular culture. For example, a 1979 Camaro is owned by Jefferson in Fast Times At Ridgemont High, a 1969 Yenko Camaro is driven by Paul Walker in 2 Fast 2 Furious, a 1968 Camaro convertible appears in the movie Pretty Woman cruising along side a Lotus, a fourth generation Camaro police car was driven by John Cena in The Marine, and the list could go on and on.