Chevy C30/K30

For those looking for a real tough truck, the 3/4-ton C20 and K20, as well as the one-ton C30, were available. Chevrolet introduced the C/K name for their full-size pickup truck line in 1962, and it lasted until 1998. The very first Chevrolet pickup truck made its debut in 1924, although in-house designs did not appear until 1930. A 10, 20, or 30 on the emblem indicates a 1/2, a 3/4, or a 1 ton truck. To distinguish between the two wheel and four wheel drive the letters “C” and ‘K’ were used. Two-wheel drive trucks were labeled with a ‘C’, while “K” models had four-wheel drive. In 1988, the C/K light-duty pickup was replaced with the GMC Sierra. The Chevrolet Silverado followed in 1999 and the Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD heavy-duty pickups also followed in 2001.

Car Transport Quotes For Chevy C30/K30

Two versions of the 1962 C/K trucks were available: smooth “Fleetside” or fendered “Stepside”. GMC on the other hand called these “Wideside” and “Fenderside.” Half-ton models were labeled the C10 and K10 short-bed trucks, and C15 and K15 was used to distinguish the long-bed trucks. You will not see the “C” nomenclature on the GMC models, although their 4×4 versions had the “K” label. Options available to the consumer were a base version and a “Custom” version. In terms of what was under the hood powering these trucks, engines included 135 hp (101 kW) 236 in(3.9 L) and 150 hp (112 kW) 261 in (4.3 L) straight-6s, and a 283 in (4.6 L) V8 with 160 hp (119 kW). The year 1967 welcomed a more modern look. This new redesign of the C/K trucks gave General Motors the opportunity to market trucks as general transportation rather than merely as work vehicles. This is a serious truck that is capable of accomplishing an enormous amount of work, do not take this lightly. You can go here for more details on the C30/K30. Car Transport Quotes for the Chevy C30/K30 are available here using our original auto transport calculator on our page.