Cadillac CTS-V

Cadillac has nearly always retained a very well regarded reputation. In the 1990s, Cadillac began to introduce a more affordable car in an effort to open up their target audience to a younger crowd. This may have been a mistake given that the Cadillac reputation was at stake. On the other hand, Cadillac was acutely aware that their current audience was aging and soon would reach the point where they were not even purchasing automobiles any longer. The CTS-V was launched as a replacement to the groundbreaking Catera. The CTS-V joins Cadillac's others high performance vehicles and is attempting to compete in a very competitive market. Introduced in 2004, it is up against other sport sedans such as the BMW M3 and M5 models, not to mention the Mercedes-Benz C55 AMG and E55 AMG. Obviously, as the name implies, it is an extension of the CTS sedan, only it is enhanced with GM performance parts like the 5.7-liter LS6 V8 from the C5-generation Chevrolet Corvette Z06. It is also enhanced with the Corvette Z06's six-speed manual Tremec transmission. Changes were implemented in 2006, at which point, the new LS2 engine superseded the LS6 engine. In terms of its outward appearance, there are fairly unique mesh grilles over the front openings, a track-ready suspension, and eighteen-inch wheels. These features have given it the opportunity to attract the younger and fresher crowd. The CTS-V came out of a close relationship between GM's Performance Division and the Cadillac engineers. This model expertly displays GM's most powerful passenger-car engine allowing the Cadillac CTS-V to deliver exceptional performance that meets or beats the competition from the European and Japanese automakers. The jury is still out on whether the CTS-V will be able to bring Cadillac the new customers that it so badly needs to stay on top in the automotive industry.